[Question] It's a good idea to split projects into smaller components?

Good evening. I was recently working on my first game, and I’m following the same approach I use for my simplier Python projects: creating separate projects for each component before merging them into a final one. Is this a good or bad idea? I feel like I should have asked this question earlier, but I only thought about the possibility of something not working now.

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Hello there,
what I would do is quite similar. For example, I would download dialogic into a new project to learn about it first so that I can aquire knowledge about it.
This is fine for learning about it, but using it just to merge them together later seems a little unnecessary.

So I wouldn’t really do it, as it can also lead to other problems relating the code and everything else once it’s packed together.

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In addition to the reasons you mentioned, another main reason for my approach is that I’ve personally broken code and even entire programs in the past because I didn’t have backups and made too many changes. That’s why I’ve tried this method, as I don’t want to ‘flood’ my GitHub account with disorganized versions.

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No, it’s not like python but the style of gdscript and python is almost same, like there is 10% difference between them

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So, the issue lies with the entire project, not just the code. For instance, I’ve completed the camera, and then I’ll move on to the inventory system, interaction system, and so on.

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A great way to prevent this, at least from what I experienced, is to optimise your current projrct as good as possible and then fo changes and additions.

After implementing the simple and SMALL change it’s time to optimise it as well. Tgis way, tracing back mistskes is easy and trying out new things becomes less of a fear.

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Ok, fair enough.

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A nice thing about godot is how easy it is to add one project to another, especially if all the dependencies are in one folder. You just copy it over into the other one. On the other hand, if you are working on a scene, you can just test that scene. It’s about as nice as it can get for that. That’s the way I develop. I don’t have a grand plan. Just a general idea and keep adding features and testing it out.

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Seems like a good way. There will of course be bugs when importing the projects over into the main one, so make sure you organize each piece into a separate folder. For example, inventory in one folder, player controller in another, and maps/levels in another. You will definitely run into bugs while instancing other scenes, so prepare for bug hunting. If you run into errors after export, launch the game from cmd or an equivalent on other platforms so the errors are printed to that window if they are causing the game to crash. Good luck!

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Absolutely! While I’ve used other engines like GameMaker and RPGMaker, and Godot has a bit of a steeper learning curve, its node system won me over with its flexibility and power. I hope you find success with your projects as well, good luck, and thank you very much!

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Thank you so much for the advice, I will definitely keep that in mind. Good luck to you, and success to you too, bud!

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